Skip to contentSkip to left sidebar Skip to right sidebar Skip to footer

News

Boil Water Notice Rescinded

On MAY 6th, 2021, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality required The City of Kenedy public water system, TX1280002, to issue a Boil Water Notice to inform customers, individuals, or employees that due to conditions which occurred recently in the public water system, the water from this public water system was required to be boiled prior to use for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

The public water system has taken the necessary corrective actions to restore the quality of the water distributed by this public water system used for drinking water or human consumption purposes and has provided TCEQ with laboratory test results that indicate that the water no longer requires boiling prior to use as of MAY 08th, 2021.

AREA: 1400 blk of ELM, 1300 blk of MESQUITE, 300-400 blk of HACKBERRY, 300-400 blk of COTTONWOOD, 100-400 blk of Graham RD. & Pine Street

If you have questions concerning this matter, you may contact Jerry Higgins at (830) 583-2230 or (830) 583-3217.

If a customer, individual, or employee wishes to contact the executive director, please call (512) 239-4691.

(RESCINDED MAY 8) Boil Water Notice for Community Public Water Systems

MAY 8 UPDATE: THE BOIL WATER NOTICE HAS BEEN RESCINDED.

 

Due to WATER MAIN REPAIR AND LOSS OF WATER PRESSURE, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has required the CITY OF KENEDY, PWS 1280002 public water system to notify all customers to boil their water prior to consumption (e.g., washing hands/face, brushing teeth, drinking, etc.). Children, seniors, and persons with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to harmful bacteria, and all customers should follow these directions).

To ensure destruction of all harmful bacteria and other microbes, water for drinking, cooking, and ice making should be boiled and cooled prior to use for drinking water or human consumption purposes. The water should be brought to a vigorous rolling boil and then boiled for two minutes.

In lieu of boiling, individuals may purchase bottled water or obtain water from some other suitable source for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

When it is no longer necessary to boil the water, the public water system officials will notify customers that the water is safe for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

Once the boil water notice is no longer in effect, the public water system will issue a notice to customers that rescinds the boil water notice in a manner similar to this notice.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

AREA AFFECTED: 1400 BLK OF ELM, 1300 BLK OF MESQUITE, 300-400 BLK OF HACKBERRY, 300-400 BLK OF COTTONWOOD, AND 100-400 BLK OF GRAHAM RD

If you have questions concerning this matter, you may contact Jerry Higgins at (303 W. Main, (830)583-2230 or (830)583-3217.

The public water system customers and the executive director shall be able to reach the public water system at one of the numbers listed in this notice. If a customer, individual, or employee wishes to contact the executive director, please call (512) 239-4691.

COVID-19 Small Business Assistance Grant

In response to the adverse economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, the Kenedy 4B Economic Development Corporation, with the support of the City of Kenedy City Council, has developed a Small Business Assistance Grant Program. This program will provide up to $6,500 to eligible small businesses that generate sales tax within Kenedy that have been signficantly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

Download Instructions & Application

COVID-19 Small Business Assistance Grant

(RESCINDED April 15) Boil Water Notice for Community Public Water Systems

APRIL 15 UPDATE: THE BOIL WATER NOTICE HAS BEEN RESCINDED.

 

Due to WATER MAIN REPAIR AND LOSS OF WATER PRESSURE, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has required the CITY OF KENEDY, PWS 1280002 public water system to notify all customers to boil their water prior to consumption (e.g., washing hands/face, brushing teeth, drinking, etc.). Children, seniors, and persons with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to harmful bacteria, and all customers should follow these directions).

To ensure destruction of all harmful bacteria and other microbes, water for drinking, cooking, and ice making should be boiled and cooled prior to use for drinking water or human consumption purposes. The water should be brought to a vigorous rolling boil and then boiled for two minutes.

In lieu of boiling, individuals may purchase bottled water or obtain water from some other suitable source for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

When it is no longer necessary to boil the water, the public water system officials will notify customers that the water is safe for drinking water or human consumption purposes.

Once the boil water notice is no longer in effect, the public water system will issue a notice to customers that rescinds the boil water notice in a manner similar to this notice.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

AREA AFFECTED: 500-700 DEWITT, 700-1100 MAYTAG, 800-900 graham rd., 100 BLK. OF LATIN AVE, 100 BLK OF ZENNETH ST., 100 BLK OF CROSELY ST. AND 300-800 KARNES ST.

If you have questions concerning this matter, you may contact Jerry Higgins at (303 W. Main, (830)583-2230 or (830)583-3217.

The public water system customers and the executive director shall be able to reach the public water system at one of the numbers listed in this notice. If a customer, individual, or employee wishes to contact the executive director, please call (512) 239-4691.

Credit Card Payments Only

In light of the recent confirmed case of COVID-19 in Karnes County and the concern of residents and staff, we are temporarily suspending in person payments of utility bills at City Hall.

Residents are being encouraged to pay their bills via the outside drop box (cash and check), online (credit card/debit card), or via telephone (credit card/debit card).

This measure will begin effectively and will last through the end of business on April 14th, at which time we will reevaluate the situation and make any necessary adjustments including extending or suspending these measures.

COVID-19 Precautions

City workers will not open the front door. If you need to speak to someone, please call (830) 583-2230. Payments can be put in the drop box outside or at the front door of our office. Payments can be made over the phone using a debit/credit card. The phone number to call is (830) 583-2230. Late fees will be waived for the month of March due to these restrictions. The last day to pay to avoid disconnection will be April 13, 2020. Disconnects will begin on April 14, 2020 at 8:00 a.m. Thank you for your patience with this matter as the City takes all preventative measures to keep employees and residents safe. Below are some websites for more information: https://www.texmed.org/Coronavirus/ https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/coronavirus/ https://www.dps.texas.gov/director_staff/media_and_communications/pr/2020/0312a

How to Find a Water Leak in Your House

How to Find a Water Leak in Your House

  In most cases the water line running to your home is “metered” for accountability and billing purposes. One small drip can lead to another and before you know it, gallons of water may have silently leaked from your faucet or toilet without you knowing about it.  Losing just one gallon of water a day due to a small leak equals 365 gallons a year. You can fill a 5-foot-by-3-foot tub with that amount of water. When you pay for your water, that leak can become very costly.

Yet, even a very small leak can be found through trying a few simple techniques and can save you from a nasty surprise from your local utility company. If you have been notified that you have a leak, here are a few steps you can do before calling a plumber. The more you do, the less it will cost you in the long run!

Turn off all faucets in the house including bathtubs, laundry sinks and outdoor faucets. Make sure the dishwasher and washing machine are not running. Turn off all other appliances that use water.

Listen to see if you can hear your water pump running for no reason if you don’t have a water meter you can check. Listen to see if the pump is humming even if you haven’t turned on a faucet, flushed the toilet or used the washing machine or dishwasher. If the pump runs for no reason, it could indicate you have a leak somewhere and you should check the house for leaks.

Go through the house and check the spouts of all the faucets for signs of a drip. Rub your finger under the spout to see if you can feel any water, even if the faucet is turned off. Look for puddles of water at the base of all the faucets. Check the shower heads to see if you notice water dripping.

Toilets

Prepare to repair! Check the toilet for leaks by removing the top off the tank and listening very closely. If you hear any hissing at all, try to locate where it is coming from. If you locate the area where the leak is coming from, assess it and determine if you can fix it. If you can’t, then call a plumber.

If nothing is noticeable, add some food coloring and put a couple of drops in the tank (not the bowl). Wait several minutes and if you have coloring in the bowl, water is leaking from the tank into the bowl even when the toilet isn’t being flushed.

Repeat this procedure with all the toilets in the house.  You have a leak in the flapper at the bottom of the tank that is allowing water to seep through.  At this point you can assess if you want to do the repair yourself, or call a plumber.

Meter Line

Check the gauge on the water meter, if you have one, after you’ve turned off all the faucets and appliances that use water, to see if the arrow is rotating on the flow indicator. A moving arrow indicates there is a leak somewhere in your house and you should check for leaks.

If the toilets are fine, check the line running from the meter to the house. While this may sound difficult, you can save money if you can locate the leak for the plumber. If you know you have a shut-off valve by the house, shut it off temporarily and check the meter by removing the lid and watching the dial on top of the meter.

If you can’t see the meter head, try digging around because they sometimes have dirt or grass covering the top of them. Once you locate it and the valve is turned off by the house, watch the meter to see if is turning. If it is still turning, then the leak is between the meter and the house.

At this point, walk the area between the meter and the shut-off valve. Look for signs of a leak such as: soft muddy areas, grass that is greener than the rest or growing much faster than other areas. If you see such an obvious sign, call the plumber or assess if you can make a repair yourself.  If you have the valve shut off at the house and the meter has stopped moving, then the leak is somewhere in the house. Try some other techniques to try to locate the problem.

Hot Water Tanks

Check the Pressure Relief Valve on the hot water tank. Sometimes these valves are plumbed directly into a drain and may be leaking without your knowledge. If you can’t remove the drain pipe to check for a leak listen for a hissing sound, it may be leaking.

Check the valves on the hot water tank for signs of drips. Hissing sounds near the pipes or valves on the tank can also indicate a leak you wouldn’t be able to see.

Hose bibs

Look at all the outside water faucets and see if there is water dripping from the faucet or from the pipe coming out of the exterior wall.  Listen carefully for any sound emitting from the hose-bib. If you hear anything at all, remember where it is (perhaps mark it with chalk), and go to the next one. If the sound emitted gets louder at any of the other hose-bibs, then the leak is closer to that particular unit. Note that and contact your plumber: Giving the plumber this information will save the plumber loads of time in finding the leak, which in turn saves you money.

If you survey all the hose-bibs and still find no sound, go into the house and follow the same process with the screwdriver on your house fittings such as faucets in sinks, shower valves, washer, hot water heater (be careful to avoid being scalded when working around the hot water heater). If you are still not sure, just contact the plumber.

Other Leaks

Pull the refrigerator away from the wall and check the connecting water line if your refrigerator has an ice-maker. Look for puddles on the floor or water dripping from the water line.

Pull the washing machine away from the wall and check the water supply line to the washer. Check for puddles under the washer.

Check the shower head for leaks. It should be a fairly straightforward home repair if this is a source of leaking.

If you have a swimming pool, it is important to check to see if it has any leaks.

Near Enough is Helpful

Recognize that in many cases a leak can be very hard to locate. Not all of the leaks can be located and if you’re not used to plumbing positioning, you may miss something easily. All the same, if you try these steps, you should be able to find an approximate location and this is a most valuable exercise in itself because it will (many plumbers do not like searching for a problem so anything you can do they will appreciate), make it a time saver for the plumber and that translates into savings for you.

Resources:  www.wikihow.comwww.ehow.com,

Interested in a Printable Version? Download it here